Field Notes Issue #20 – November 14th, 2020

November 14th, 2020 | Posted by ww-seva2 in field notes | news - (Comments Off)
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When you listen to Krishna’s pastimes it is never that you haven’t heard them before. You have heard them before, and yet we want to hear them again and again. When I think of Damodara, I think of thieves. Srila Prabhupada calls it the “stealing propensity.”
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Field Notes Issue #19 – November 1st, 2020

November 1st, 2020 | Posted by ww-seva2 in field notes - (Comments Off)
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There is a very simple answer to all questions about the spiritual world. A very simple one. In the spiritual world everything is possible. That is the nature of the spiritual world. This is the place where everything is possible. And one of the things that is possible … it is not likely, but it is possible, because if it wouldn’t be, it wouldn’t be the spiritual world … is that one leaves the spiritual world.
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Field Notes Issue #18 – September 25th, 2020

September 25th, 2020 | Posted by ww-seva2 in field notes - (Comments Off)
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dirty, power can corrupt, and people are unfair. The righteous live in a world where many things are beyond their control, and none more so than time. Time’s movement is a salient marker of the human condition, and thus the Purāṇa shows concern to systematically describe time—the passing of ages, the genealogies of kings, the movements of the planets, and the cycles of creation.
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Field Notes Issue #17 – August 26th, 2020

August 26th, 2020 | Posted by ww-seva2 in field notes - (Comments Off)
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If anyone is sanctioned to associate with Krishna, it is Radha, for she is the divine heroine of a divine drama, the ultimate model of devotion to God, and hence the embodiment of perfect chastity. That Radha and Krishna’s relationship appears to be illicit simply heightens the romantic element of the drama, inviting the worshiper to abandon the distractions of this world to enter into the transcendent realm of rich and exciting transcendent rasa.
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Field Notes Issue #15 – July 11th, 2020

July 11th, 2020 | Posted by ww-seva2 in field notes - (Comments Off)
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The idea of Dialogical Vaishnavism is a little bit strange, unfortunately, although it should not be. “Dialogical” means having a dialogue. Dialogue means that you have at least two people and they speak with each other. There is a conversation. Dialogue is about back and forth, while sometimes devotees think we are in a one-way street. We give out the mercy. We are a preaching mission, we give. This is a nice idea, to give, but also, we hear about receiving, from Rupa Goswami.
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Field Notes Issue #14 – June 14th, 2020

June 14th, 2020 | Posted by ww-seva2 in field notes - (Comments Off)
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Friendship is a good thing. When it is seen amongst devotees, it attracts more devotees. I will tell you a nice story. I do not know if it is from the Christian tradition or the Jewish tradition, or a combination of both. It is an interreligious story. There was a monastery where there were one abbot and five monks. They were quite elderly and becoming more and more aware of the fact that they were getting older and older and one after another they would probably make their “exit stage left”, as we say in English. They were concerned, “What to do? We are not getting any new bhaktas!”
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Field Notes Issue #13 – May 10th, 2020

May 10th, 2020 | Posted by ww-seva2 in field notes - (Comments Off)
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While we are deprived of the possibility to go to temples, we can worship Krishna in His Deity form at home. As Srila Prabhupada would often say (paraphrasing), “There is no restriction in the worship of Krishna. We can always worship Krishna, in any circumstances.”
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Field Notes Issue #12 – April 5th, 2020

April 5th, 2020 | Posted by ww-seva2 in field notes - (Comments Off)
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In his description of the Kali age, Shuka recites the Bhumi-gita—the Song of the Earth (BhP 12.3). In this song, Earth (as a feminine personage) laughs at the folly of countless kings in their futile efforts to conquer her. In seeking control of her, they fail to control their own sensory urges and become oblivious to their own impending death (BhP 12.3.4–5).
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